Bruce Jenner, Olympic hero or bit-player step-Dad on reality TV’s Kardashian franchise?

We prefer to remember Bruce in his glory days, winning the gold medal for the decathlon in the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal. Holy hunk! This was what the world’s greatest athlete looked like back then.

Following his Olympic triumph, Jenner famously laid down his javelin, discus and cleats for commercial endorsements like the cover of the Wheaties box and an ill-fated acting career that got him better known for an alleged addiction to Botox and Kardashians. 

More on Bruce Jenner, then and now, here.

Gore Vidal, celebrated American writer, has died at age 86. Over a career that spanned seven decades he penned numerous novels, essays, plays and screenplays.
But what he may be best remembered for, at least by those who remember TV before cable, will be his appearances on TV talk shows.
As Vidal himself once said,

"I never miss a chance to have sex or appear on television."

They don’t make writers - or personalities - like Gore Vidal anymore. This is an AP photo of Vidal, taken in 1974.

Gore Vidal, celebrated American writer, has died at age 86. Over a career that spanned seven decades he penned numerous novels, essays, plays and screenplays.

But what he may be best remembered for, at least by those who remember TV before cable, will be his appearances on TV talk shows.

As Vidal himself once said,

"I never miss a chance to have sex or appear on television."

They don’t make writers - or personalities - like Gore Vidal anymore. This is an AP photo of Vidal, taken in 1974.

R.I.P. Dr. Sally Ride, America’s first woman in space. When she was part of the 1983 Challenger crew she was also the youngest American to ever enter space. She still is. 

And, she is also, apparently the only NASA astronaut to have ever been photographed with a Muppet!

Go to the New York Times to read about Sally Ride’s lifetime accomplishments. She was a true American trailblazer, whose death from pancreatic cancer at 61 was way too soon.

Editta Sherman may be better known as “the Duchess of Carnegie Hall.”
That’s what her neighbor, New York Times Style photographer Bill Cunningham dubbed her in the documentary about his photo taking released last year. But Sherman has had an extensive photo career of her own, beginning in the 1930s. This week, she celebrates her 100th birthday.
As a widow, Sherman raised her four children in her studio above Carnegie Hall, supporting all with her photo work. She typically did family and children’s portraits to pay the bills, but a friendship with actor Frank Morgan (The Wizard of Oz) and her location in New York City led to many more celebrated photo opps with the likes of Henry Fonda, Yul Brunner, Tyrone Power, and yes - even Elvis and Andy (Presley and Warhol, of course).
A very short and interesting exhibit of Sherman’s work is on right now through July 29 at 25 CPW Gallery in New York City. The exhibit re-creates Sherman’s Carnegie Hall studio space, which she was evicted from, along with several other artists, in 2010.
Click here for a more extensive bio and slideshow: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/09/the-duchess-of-carnegie-hall-turns-100/?smid=tw-share

Editta Sherman may be better known as “the Duchess of Carnegie Hall.”

That’s what her neighbor, New York Times Style photographer Bill Cunningham dubbed her in the documentary about his photo taking released last year. But Sherman has had an extensive photo career of her own, beginning in the 1930s. This week, she celebrates her 100th birthday.

As a widow, Sherman raised her four children in her studio above Carnegie Hall, supporting all with her photo work. She typically did family and children’s portraits to pay the bills, but a friendship with actor Frank Morgan (The Wizard of Oz) and her location in New York City led to many more celebrated photo opps with the likes of Henry Fonda, Yul Brunner, Tyrone Power, and yes - even Elvis and Andy (Presley and Warhol, of course).

A very short and interesting exhibit of Sherman’s work is on right now through July 29 at 25 CPW Gallery in New York City. The exhibit re-creates Sherman’s Carnegie Hall studio space, which she was evicted from, along with several other artists, in 2010.

Click here for a more extensive bio and slideshow: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/09/the-duchess-of-carnegie-hall-turns-100/?smid=tw-share

We love a good, juicy, sexy ’70s read. A new book by Christopher Anderson, Mick: The Wild Life and Mad Genius of Jagger, “lays bare the Satanic Majesty’s sexual forays,” including this exclusive excerpt about Jagger’s dalliance with icon David Bowie.

Photos of both stars circa 1973 during their glitter-glam rock phases from the book are shown here.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/new-book-takes-mick-jagger-affair-david-bowie-article-1.1109887

Forty-four years ago today, Senator Robert Francis Kennedy (RFK), was shot and mortally wounded at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. The younger brother of President Kennedy, RFK was contending for his own run for the White House when the assassin’s bullet struck him from behind in the hotel’s kitchen, where he was shaking hands with workers after having just won the California Democratic Primary.

This photo was taken by Bill Eppridge for Time-Life and appeared in LIFE Magazine. The caption read:

"Rigid, semiconscious, his face an ashen mask, Senator Kennedy lies in a pool of his own blood on the concrete floor, a bullet deep in his brain and another in his neck. Juan Romero, a busboy whose hand Kennedy had shaken before the shots, tried to comfort him."

Eppridge’s photos from that sad night in American history can be viewed here: http://life.time.com/history/behind-the-picture-rfks-assassination/#ixzz1wxNVTdL0

Buzzfeed has put together a collection of the “40 Most Powerful Photos Ever Taken” over the last 100 years. It’s an eclectic selection of some sure-fire memorable photos that belong in anyone’s Photo Hall of Fame. And then some others that we’re not so sure about. One everyone can agree on though is “Earthrise”. A photo taken by astronaut William Anders during the Apollo 8 mission in 1968.

Click here to see the other 39 photos.

Twenty years ago, in 1992, the New York Times started its popular Sunday “Vows” column. Each week, as a supplement to the marriage and engagement announcements, one couple is profiled. The Times has kept pace with reality, and the couple can be gay or straight. They can also be ordinary or super famous.
This Sunday’s Times looks back at some of the more well-known couples first featured in 1992. Some like supermodel Iman and rock legend David Bowie are still together, while others like Paula Abdul and Emilio Estevez had a particularly short shelf-life (two years).
Another couple who has withstood the test of time - Barack and Michelle Obama. Click here to see more photos from 1992.

Twenty years ago, in 1992, the New York Times started its popular Sunday “Vows” column. Each week, as a supplement to the marriage and engagement announcements, one couple is profiled. The Times has kept pace with reality, and the couple can be gay or straight. They can also be ordinary or super famous.

This Sunday’s Times looks back at some of the more well-known couples first featured in 1992. Some like supermodel Iman and rock legend David Bowie are still together, while others like Paula Abdul and Emilio Estevez had a particularly short shelf-life (two years).

Another couple who has withstood the test of time - Barack and Michelle Obama. Click here to see more photos from 1992.

His name was Wladziu (or Vładziu) Valentino Liberace, but we knew him best by just his last name and flamboyance. He was born on this day, May 16, in 1919, which means he would have been 93 if he were still alive.

Liberace died in 1987, but his career

spanned four decades of concerts, recordings, motion pictures, television and endorsements…. During the 1950s–1970s he was the highest-paid entertainer in the world and embraced a lifestyle of flamboyant excess both on and off the stage [Wikipedia]

How do you let the world’s oldest teenager rest in peace? When Dick Clark, long-time host of American Bandstand and one of our longest-running on-the-air TV personalities passed away this week at the age of 82, Americans took to the interwebs to laugh, cry, share and snark in a collective show of mass online grief.

Photos seem to be the preferred way to remember a man who spent almost 60 years on our TV screens. Photo tributes are being posted on major online news outlets and blogs no one has ever heard of (like this one!).

We are getting to see some wonderfully candid “from the archives” shots of America’s oldest teenager. This photo belongs to Life magazine, although it is unclear if it was ever published. Dick Clark is to the right.

The photo was taken in 1977 at the American Music Awards in Los Angeles. Tennessee Governor Ray Blanton (left) has just presented Johnny Cash with a trophy for outstanding contributions to musical entertainment. Cash’s wife June Carter Cash looks on. Their son John Carter Cash holds the award.